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The Fall - Grotesque

26.99
sold out
Grotesque_cover.jpg

The Fall - Grotesque

26.99
sold out

This was the first album for drummer Paul Hanley (Steve Hanley's younger brother), who joined The Fall earlier in the year aged just 15.

The album was preceded by two acclaimed singles "How I Wrote 'Elastic Man'" and "Totally Wired", which were subsequently included on CD reissues of the album. The eye-catching full colour sleeve (the group's first) was drawn by Mark E. Smith's sister, Suzanne.

The album was much more outward-looking than its predecessor, Dragnet (1979), and Smith's lyrical maturity was striking, reading as a state-of-the-nation address on "English Scheme" and "C'n'C-S Mithering". The album also included the gothic horror of "Impression of J. Temperance" and the conspiracy theory-fuelled "New Face in Hell". In fact, a number of the tracks have particularly idiosyncratic titles: "The N.W.R.A.", representing the track's lyric, "the north will rise again" (not, as some supposed, "The North West Republican Army"[1]); "C'n'C-S Mithering", a reference to cash and carries, specifically two warehouses near Manchester, and "W.M.C. – Blob 59", WMC being a common abbreviation for Working Men's Club.

According to the Slates & Dates press release, this album was, at one point, to be titled After the Gramme – The Grotesque Peasants.

"New Face in Hell" takes its name from the 1968 film P. J. which was retitled New Face in Hell in the UK.

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This was the first album for drummer Paul Hanley (Steve Hanley's younger brother), who joined The Fall earlier in the year aged just 15.

The album was preceded by two acclaimed singles "How I Wrote 'Elastic Man'" and "Totally Wired", which were subsequently included on CD reissues of the album. The eye-catching full colour sleeve (the group's first) was drawn by Mark E. Smith's sister, Suzanne.

The album was much more outward-looking than its predecessor, Dragnet (1979), and Smith's lyrical maturity was striking, reading as a state-of-the-nation address on "English Scheme" and "C'n'C-S Mithering". The album also included the gothic horror of "Impression of J. Temperance" and the conspiracy theory-fuelled "New Face in Hell". In fact, a number of the tracks have particularly idiosyncratic titles: "The N.W.R.A.", representing the track's lyric, "the north will rise again" (not, as some supposed, "The North West Republican Army"[1]); "C'n'C-S Mithering", a reference to cash and carries, specifically two warehouses near Manchester, and "W.M.C. – Blob 59", WMC being a common abbreviation for Working Men's Club.

According to the Slates & Dates press release, this album was, at one point, to be titled After the Gramme – The Grotesque Peasants.

"New Face in Hell" takes its name from the 1968 film P. J. which was retitled New Face in Hell in the UK.