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The Fall - Hex Enduction Hour

27.99
sold out
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The Fall - Hex Enduction Hour

27.99
sold out

Hex Enduction Hour is the fourth studio album by the English post-punk band the Fall. Released on 8 March 1982, it builds on the low-fidelity production values and caustic lyrical content of their earlier recordings. Fall frontman Mark E. Smith establishes an abrasive Northern aesthetic built in part from the 20th century literary traditions of kitchen sink and magic realism. Smith described it as an often satirical, but deliberate reaction to the contemporary music scene; a stand against "bland bastards like Elvis Costello and Spandau Ballet ... [and] all that shit."[A]

Recording began during a 1981 three concert visit of Iceland, when Smith was inspired both by the otherworldliness of the landscape, its history and the enthusiasm of an audience unused to visiting rock groups.[1][2] The Fall recorded "Hip Priest", "Iceland" and non-album single "Look, Know" at the Hljóðriti studio in Reykjavík, and the remaining tracks in a disused cinema in Hitchin, Hertfordshire on their return to England. The album was widely praised on release as fully capturing their aggressive live sound. The UK recordings and later promotion were funded by the independent record label Kamera following a bitter and protracted dispute between Smith and former label Rough Trade Records. Hex Enduction Hour was well received by critics, and sold well relative to its release on a small label, and earned The Fall their first UK Albums Chart placing at No. 71. Today it is considered a hallmark of the post-punk era.

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Hex Enduction Hour is the fourth studio album by the English post-punk band the Fall. Released on 8 March 1982, it builds on the low-fidelity production values and caustic lyrical content of their earlier recordings. Fall frontman Mark E. Smith establishes an abrasive Northern aesthetic built in part from the 20th century literary traditions of kitchen sink and magic realism. Smith described it as an often satirical, but deliberate reaction to the contemporary music scene; a stand against "bland bastards like Elvis Costello and Spandau Ballet ... [and] all that shit."[A]

Recording began during a 1981 three concert visit of Iceland, when Smith was inspired both by the otherworldliness of the landscape, its history and the enthusiasm of an audience unused to visiting rock groups.[1][2] The Fall recorded "Hip Priest", "Iceland" and non-album single "Look, Know" at the Hljóðriti studio in Reykjavík, and the remaining tracks in a disused cinema in Hitchin, Hertfordshire on their return to England. The album was widely praised on release as fully capturing their aggressive live sound. The UK recordings and later promotion were funded by the independent record label Kamera following a bitter and protracted dispute between Smith and former label Rough Trade Records. Hex Enduction Hour was well received by critics, and sold well relative to its release on a small label, and earned The Fall their first UK Albums Chart placing at No. 71. Today it is considered a hallmark of the post-punk era.