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Donald Fagen - The Nightfly

34.99
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Donald Fagen - The Nightfly

34.99

The Nightfly is the first solo album by Steely Dan co-founder Donald Fagen, released in 1982. It is an early example of a fully digital recording in popular music.[1] Although The Nightfly includes a number of production staff and musicians who had played on Steely Dan records, it is Fagen's first release without longtime collaborator Walter Becker.

Unlike most of Fagen's previous work, The Nightfly is almost blatantly autobiographical.[2] Many of the songs relate to the cautiously optimistic mood of his suburban childhood in the late 1950s and early 1960s, and incorporate such topics as late-night jazz disc jockeys, fallout shelters, and tropical vacations.

The Nightfly was certified Platinum in both the US and UK, and produced two popular hits with "I.G.Y." and "New Frontier". It also received several 1983 Grammy Award nominations. This relatively low-key but long-lived popularity led The Wall Street Journal in 2007 to dub the album "one of pop music's sneakiest masterpieces."[2]

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The Nightfly is the first solo album by Steely Dan co-founder Donald Fagen, released in 1982. It is an early example of a fully digital recording in popular music.[1] Although The Nightfly includes a number of production staff and musicians who had played on Steely Dan records, it is Fagen's first release without longtime collaborator Walter Becker.

Unlike most of Fagen's previous work, The Nightfly is almost blatantly autobiographical.[2] Many of the songs relate to the cautiously optimistic mood of his suburban childhood in the late 1950s and early 1960s, and incorporate such topics as late-night jazz disc jockeys, fallout shelters, and tropical vacations.

The Nightfly was certified Platinum in both the US and UK, and produced two popular hits with "I.G.Y." and "New Frontier". It also received several 1983 Grammy Award nominations. This relatively low-key but long-lived popularity led The Wall Street Journal in 2007 to dub the album "one of pop music's sneakiest masterpieces."[2]